i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

A randomised crossover trial comparing the i-gel® supraglottic airway and classic laryngeal mask airway

Janakiraman C, Chethan DB, Wilkes AR, Stacey MR, Goodwin, N. Anaesthesia 2009; 64(6): 674-678

This study compared the performance of i-gel® and cLMA airways in 50 healthy adult patients. The success rate on the first insertion attempt was significantly lower in the i-gel® group. Overall success after two attempts did not show a significant difference, although a change of device size was allowed. Leak pressures and fibreoptic view of the vocal cords were significantly better with the i-gel®, with the two devices producing leak pressures of 20 (i-gel®) and 17cm H2O (cLMA). 14 patients needed a change in i-gel® size.

Link to abstract.

 

Improved patient survival using a modified resuscitation protocol for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Garza AG, Gratton MC, Salomone JA, Lindholm D, McElroy J, Archer R. Circulation 2009; 119(19): 2597-605

A retrospective observational cohort study reviewing all adult primary ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia cardiac arrests before and after protocol changes in the Emergency Medical System in Kansas City in the USA. Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac origin improved from 7.5% to 13.9%, and survival to hospital discharge increased from an unadjusted rate of 22.4% to 43.9%. Authors confirm that the protocol changes optimising chest compressions with reduced disruptions improved return of spontaneous circulation and survival to discharge in their patients.

Abstract text

Comparison of the i-gel and the laryngeal mask airway proseal during general anesthesia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Park SK, Choi GJ, Choi YS, Ahn EJ, Kang H

During the meta-analysis, 12 studies were evaluated to find no significant differences in first attempt success rate, leak pressure and quality of fibreoptic view between the devices. i-gel had a shorter insertion time and lower blood staining incidence, sore throat reports and dysphagia.

Link to abstract

The i-gel®, a single-use supraglottic airway device with a non-inflatable cuff and an esophageal vent: An observational study in children

Beylacq L, Bordes M, Semjen F, Cros AM. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 2009; 53(3): 376-379

This study evaluated the i-gel® in 50 children above 30kg undergoing short-duration surgery. The parameters measured included: ease of insertion, seal pressure, ease of inserting a gastric tube and post operative complications. The first time insertion success rate was 100%. No laryngeal leak occurred. The mean seal pressure was 24.9cm H20. The authors concluded that i-gel® was very easy to insert and that ‘no learning curve is needed before a high success insertion rate is obtained. The i-gel® appears to be safe for paediatric management’.

Link to abstract.

Successful use of the i-gel® airway in prone position surgery

Senthil Kumar M, Pandey R, Khanna P. Pediatr Anaesth 2009; 19(2): 176-7

This report highlighted the case of a 10-year-old child, weighing 30kg, scheduled for an elective pyeloplasty. A size three i-gel® was inserted and secured after confirming correct placement and a suction catheter inserted down the gastric channel. The child was positioned prone and the correct positioning of i-gel® reconfirmed by appropriate CO2 wave form, absence of audible leak and chest auscultation. At the end of the procedure, the child was returned to a supine position and i-gel® removed after reversal. The patient recovered without any complications.

Link to abstract.