i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Evaluation of the i-gel® airway in 300 patients

Bamgbade OA, Macnab WR, Khalaf WM. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2008; 25(10): 865-6
This letter reported that first time insertion with i-gel® was achieved in <5 seconds in 290/300 patients. Three patients with difficult airway underwent successful fibreoptic endotracheal intubation through i-gel® and all patients underwent adequate pressure mode ventilation with airway pressures of 10-30cm H2O initially and spontaneous breathing subsequently. In addition, lubricated gastric tubes were easily inserted through the gastric channel at the first attempt in all 80 cases where this was performed. The authors concluded that ‘i-gel® is very suitable for peri-operative airway management, positive pressure ventilation and weaning from ventilation. It is also useful as an intubation aid and has a potential role in airway management during resuscitation. It is very easy to use, highly reliable and associated with minimal morbidity. The gastric channel separates the oesophagus from the larynx and provides protection from aspiration. Further studies are required to compare i-gel® with other supraglottic devices.’

Abstract text

Evaluation of the size 4 i-gel® airway in one hundred nonparalysed patients

Gatward JJ, Cook TM, Seller C, Handel J, Simpson T, Vanek V, Kelly F. Anaesthesia 2008; 63(10):1124-1130

A study of i-gel® in 100 elective, anaesthetised patients. Parameters assessed included ease of use, positioning, airway quality, seal pressure and complications. First time insertion success was 86%. Median airway leak pressure was 24cm H2O. On fibreoptic examination via the device, the vocal cords were visible in 91% of patients. The incidence of airway obstruction, airway irritation, oropharyngeal trauma and other complications was low. Insertion of the device into the correct position was rapid and easy. The authors concluded that, ‘these attributes would suggest potential roles in anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and airway management during CPR’. Further studies are now indicated against i-gel®’s likely clinical competitors.

Link to abstract.

 

Evaluation of the i-gel® airway in 300 patients

Bamgbade OA, Macnab WR, Khalaf WM. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2008; 25(10): 865-866

This letter reported that first time insertion with i-gel® was achieved in <5 seconds in 290/300 patients. Three patients with difficult airway underwent successful fibreoptic endotracheal intubation through i-gel® and all patients underwent adequate pressure mode ventilation with airway pressures of 10-30cm H2O initially and spontaneous breathing subsequently. In addition, lubricated gastric tubes were easily inserted through the gastric channel at the first attempt in all 80 cases where this was performed. The authors concluded that ‘i-gel® is very suitable for peri-operative airway management, positive pressure ventilation and weaning from ventilation. It is also useful as an intubation aid and has a potential role in airway management during resuscitation.'

Link to abstract.

Cardiocerebral resuscitation improves neurologically intact survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Kellum M J, Kennedy K W, Barney R, Keilhauer F A, Bellino M, Zuercher M, Ewy G. Ann Emerg Med 2008; 52(3): 244-52

The objective of this study was to compare a newly implemented protocol using the principles of cardiocerebral resuscitation against 2000 American Heart Association Guidelines for treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Data was collected retrospectively from the two study groups, each spanning a three-year period. Cerebral performance category scores were used to define the neurological status of survivors, with ‘1’ considered as ‘intact’ survival. Prior to the protocol change, 18 of 92 (20%) survived and 14 (15%) were intact. After the implementation, 42 of 89 (47%) survived and 35 (39%) were intact. Authors conclude that the implementation was associated with ‘a dramatic improvement in neurologically intact survival.’

Abstract text

Use of the epiglottic airway i-gel® during anaesthetic maintenance: first clinical impressions

Mustafaeva MN, Mizikov VM, Kochneva ZV, Vashchinskaia TV, Sarkisova NG, Rusakov MA, Levitskaia NN. Anesteziol Reanimatol 2008; (5): 55-58

This paper describes the development of supraglottic airways and the i-gel® in particular. A review of the available i-gel® literature showed that there are considerable benefits to using the device during general anaesthesia. The experiences of the authors during the use of i-gel® in 34 patients are also described. The authors believe that the i-gel® is suitable for use during anaesthesia and potentially resuscitation. However, more research should be carried out, especially in terms of comparison with other supraglottic airways.

Link to abstract.