i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Nerve damage following the use of an i-gel® supraglottic airway device

Theron AD, Loyden C. Anaesthesia 2008; 63(4): 441-442

This article describes a post-operative complication after i-gel® use. The patient was successfully ventilated with a size four i-gel®, which was in line with the recommendation for the patient’s weight (85kg). After surgery, the patient reported numbness in the lower lip. An examination shows swelling and an ulcer on the inside of the lip. There are two possible explanations for this injury – the patient’s lip may have been caught in the tape used to secure the i-gel® or it may have been caught in between the i-gel® and the patient’s teeth. The authors warn that this could occur with any airway device, but that extra care should be taken with the i-gel® due to the bulkier design.

Link to abstract.

Case series: protection from aspiration and failure of protection from aspiration with the i-gel® airway

Gibbison B, Cook TM, Seller C. Br J Anaesth 2008; 100(3): 415-417

Regurgitation of gastric contents was seen in three low-risk patients during anaesthesia. In two patients where only low volumes of gastric fluid were seen flowing from the i-gel®, there was no sign of aspiration. An 85kg male patient regurgitated large amounts of liquid, and although this was mostly expelled from the i-gel®’s gastric channel there were signs of minor aspiration. The i-gel® allowed early identification of regurgitation in these cases.

Link to abstract.

Strategies to prevent unrecognised oesophageal intubation during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Nolan J. Resuscitation 2008; 76(1): 1-2

From the abstract: ‘Tracheal intubation has long been regarded as a fundamental and essential component of advanced life support (ALS). It has been assumed that tracheal intubation improves the chances of surviving from cardiac arrest. There are no reliable data to support this belief and there are several reasons why attempted intubation can be harmful, particularly when undertaken by inexperienced individuals.’

Abstract text

Early experiences with the i-gel®

Dinsmore J, Maxwell W, Ickeringill M. J Resuscitation 2007; 5(4): 574-575

In the study described in this letter, 39 anaesthetists completed ease of use surveys for 227 i-gel® devices. Compared with their experience of the cLMA®, the anaesthetists considered the i-gel® quick and easy to insert. Insertion and ventilation on the first attempt were successful in the majority of cases. There were 18 unsatisfactory airways, six of which were caused by incorrect sizing. The i-gel® was comparable to the cLMA® in terms of adverse effects such as visible blood and sore throat.

Link to abstract.

The i-gel® supraglottic airway and resuscitation - some initial thoughts

Soar J. Resuscitation 2007; 74(1): 197

This case report detailed use of a size four i-gel® during a cardiac arrest. The i-gel® was inserted in <10 seconds from opening the packet. The author was able to ventilate the patient’s lungs easily using a self-inflating bag-valve device connected to the i-gel®. The patient’s lungs were ventilated asynchronously during chest compressions with no leak. There was no evidence of aspiration. In addition, this case report confirmed the training of five non-anaesthetic trainee doctors to insert the i-gel® and ventilate an anaesthetised patient after minimal instruction. All these trainees rated i-gel® easier to insert than a laryngeal mask airway.

Link to abstract.