i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Pre-hospital i-gel blind intubation for trauma: a simulation study

Kim JG, Kim W, Kang GH, Jang YS, Choi HY, Kim H, Kim M. Clin Exp Emerg Med. 2018 Mar 30;5(1):29-34. 

This prospective randomised crossover study was carried out to evaluate the performance and efficacy of the i-gel blind intubation (IGI) in airway management for pre-hospital trauma patients. Here, two blind intubation techniques were assessed (by 18 paramedics) using two supraglottic airway devices (IGI and LMA Fastrach) and a Macintosh laryngoscope (MCL).

Link to abstract.

I-gel™ May be the Device of Choice for Controlled Ventilation in Patients with Hemophilia Undergoing Abdominal Laparoscopic Surgery

Sen S, Mitra K, Ganguli S, Mukherji S. Anesth Essays Res. 2018 Jan-Mar;12(1):288-290

Peri-operative management of patients with haemophilia involves the risks of excessive bleeding. This is especially true when securing the patient’s airways during anaesthesia with standard instrumentation (e.g. direct laryngoscopy), as this could lead to severe haemorrhage. Therefore, this case study assessed the efficacy of the i-gel in the airway management of a patient with haemophilia undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Link to abstract.

An exploration of the views of paramedics regarding airway management

Brandling J, Rhys M, Thomas M, Voss S, Davies S, Benger J. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2016; 24: 56

A study within a UK ambulance study exploring the customs and beliefs or paramedics in relation to airway management and whether tracheal intubation sustains professional identity. Interviews were conducted with 17 participants, which identified four key factors: pride, utility, expectations and professionalisation. Authors conclude the interviews identified a 'wide range of views' on airway management based on evidence and experience.

Link to abstract

The Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines and the sacred cows of routine airway management

Cook TM, Kelly FE. Anaesthesia. 2016 Apr;71(4):466-7

Based on the findings of the DAS 2015 guidelines, the authors argue that evidence suggests 2nd generation supraglottic airway devices perform better than 1st generation equivalents, and that 2nd gen should be used for airway rescue and routine airway management.

Link to abstract

Randomised comparison of the effectiveness of the laryngeal mask airway supreme, i-gel and current practice in the initial airway management of out of hospital cardiac arrest (REVIVE-Airways): a feasibility study

Benger J, Coates D, Davies S, Greenwood R, Nolan J, Rhys M, Thomas M, Voss S. Br J Anaesth. 2016;116(2):262-8

A cluster randomised trial of paramedics within one ambulance service in England over a 12-month period, split into groups using either the i-gel or LMA Supreme or usual practice for all patients with non-traumatic adult OHCA. Primary outcome was study feasibility, including recruitment and protocol adherence. Secondary outcomes included survival to hospital discharge and to 90 days. 184 of 535 paramedics consented, with 615 patients recruited. The LMA Supreme arm was suspended following 'adverse incidents'. No differences were reported in secondary outcomes.

Link to abstract