i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Easy airway management using the i-gel™ supraglottic airway in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome

Soh J, Shin HW, Choi SU, Lim CH, Lee HW. Korean J Anesthesiol. 2014 Dec;67(Suppl):S17-8

Case report of failed fibreoptic intubation and videolaryngoscope on a 25-year-old male with TCS who had undergone emergency abdominal surgery. i-gel was used instead and was inserted on first attempt and the airway successully maintained.

Link to abstract

 

Evaluation of chest compression effect on airway management with air-Q, aura-i, i-gel, and Fastrack intubating supraglottic devices by novice physicians: a randomized crossover simulation study

Komasawa N, Ueki R, Kaminoh Y, Nishi S. J Anesth. 2014 Oct;28(5):676-80

Insertion time and successful ventilation rate were measured, with the latter unaffected by chest compression. 

Link to abstract

Emergency airway management by paramedics: comparison between standard endotracheal intubation, laryngeal mask airway, and I-gel

Leventis C, Chalkias A, Sampanis M A, Foulidou X, Xanthos T. Eur J Emerg Med. 2014 Oct; 21(5): 371-3

Study to investigate intubation skill levels of 72 paramedics using ETI, LMA and i-gel® in a manikin model. The success rate was higher, and the insertion time lower for those using i-gel®. There was a ‘statistically significant association’ between experience level and insertion time of LMA. Authors conclude that paramedics should ‘lay greater emphasis on airway management using supraglottic devices, especially i-gel®’.

Link to abstract

Pre-hospital airway management: The data grows rapidly but controversy remains

Lockey D, Lossius HM. Resuscitation 2014; 85(7): 849-50

An editorial discussing three studies published in the same journal issue covering different aspects of emergency advanced airway management, both out of and inside the hospital.

Link to abstract

 

Higher insertion success with the i-gel supraglottic airway in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a randomised controlled trial

Middleton PM, Simpson PM, Thomas RE, Bendall JC. Resuscitation 2014;85(7):893-7

Subjects with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were allocated to either the i-gel or Portex Soft Seal laryngeal mask group, within a large Australian ambulance group. Primary outcome was successful insertion of the airway. The i-gel had a significantly higher success rate than Portex Soft Seal and significantly lower median ease of insertion scores.

Link to abstract