i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Comparison of blind intubation through the i-gel and ILMA Fastrach by nurses during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a manikin study

Melissopoulou T, Stroumpoulis K, Sampanis M A, Vrachnis N, Papadopoulos G, Chalkias A, Xanthos T. Heart Lung. 2014 Mar-Apr; 43(2): 112-6

A group of 45 nurses inserted the i-gel® and ILMA in a manikin with and without continuous chest compressions. ILMA proved more successful than the i-gel®, but continuation of compressions caused higher insertion times in both devices. Authors conclude that nursing staff can use both devices ‘as conduits with comparable success rates, regardless of whether chest compressions are interrupted or not’.

Link to abstract

Performance of the i-gel™ during pre-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Häske D, Schempf B, Gaier G, Niederberger C. Resuscitation 2013; 84(9): 1229-32

This observational study of i-gel® use during CPR assessed ease of insertion, ventilation quality, leak and whether ventilation was possible without chest compression interruption. Insertions were attempted by 63 paramedics and seven emergency physicians in pre-hospital CPR, with an overall 90% first-attempt insertion success rate. Insertion was reported as easy in 80% of cases, with the same figure representing cases with no leak recorded. In 74% of cases, continuous chest compression was still possible. The authors say that, ‘the i-gel is an easy supraglottic device to insert and enables adequate ventilation during CPR’.

Link to abstract

The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using supraglottic airways and intraosseous devices: a simulation trial

Reiter DA, Strother CG, Weingart SD. Resuscitation 2013; 84(1): 93-7

Emergency Medicine residents split into teams took part in two simulated ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrests using a high fidelity simulator, testing whether use of a laryngeal mask airway improved resuscitation results. Time to airway placement, duration and success rate of airway placement and percent hands off time were among results measured. Authors conclude that use of a laryngeal mask and an IO device led to ‘significantly faster establishment of an airway’

Abstract