i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Tracheal compression caused by oversized i-gel® in children

Agnoletti V, Piraccini E, Corso RM, Cittadini A, Maitan S, Della Rocca G, Gambale G. Minerva Anestesiol 2012; 79(1):107-8

Unlike other supraglottic airway devices, paediatric i-gel® does not cause artifacts when used for MRI. The authors of this study found, after evaluation, that the patient weight grading could be an inadequate criteria for i-gel® selection for MRI due to the potential for partial or even complete airway obstruction. This study does not rule out the use of a paediatric i-gel® entirely, merely pointing to the importance of size selection. The authors deduce that further studies in this area should be conducted to substantiate the evidence.

Link to abstract.

The use of i-gel® extraglottic airway during percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy: a case series

Corso RM, Piraccini E, Agnoletti V, Baccanelli M, Coffa A, Gambale G. Minerva Anaestesiol 2011; 77(8): 852-3

The i-gel® was used in eight patients for tracheostomy. Patients were extubated and the ET tube was replaced with the i-gel®. A percutaneous tracheostomy kit was then advanced to the second tracheal ring and the procedure was performed. Arterial pressure, PaO2/FiO2, minute ventilation and airway pressure were measured before, during and after tracheostomy. There were no significant differences in ventilatory and haemodynamic parameters. Use of the i-gel® was successful in seven of eight patients. The i-gel® provided better views of the glottis compared to the cLMA and ventilation was comparable to the ET tube. Large trials must take place to determine whether a one in eight failure rate remains.

Abstract text

Use of an i-gel® in a ‘can’t intubate/can’t ventilate’ situation

Corso RM, Piraccini E, Agnoletti V, Gambale G. Anaesth Intensive Care 2010; 38(1): 211

This report details the use of an i-gel® to provide an airway for a 63-year-old male with severe subglottic swelling. Two prior attempts at insertion of a gum elastic bougie failed and facemask ventilation was ineffective. A well-known brand of laryngeal mask was inserted, but ventilation was impossible, so it was removed and replaced with an i-gel®. Subsequent intubation through the i-gel® was performed successfully with a flexible fibrescope.

Abstract text

Phenomenon with i-gel® airway?

Baxter, S. Anaesthesia 2008; 63(11): 1265

This correspondence article reports a problem that occurred in two patients ventilated with an i-gel® during anaesthesia. In the first case, anaesthesia started to lighten and end-tidal sevoflurane fell. The user suspected air entrainment through the suction port. In the second case, anaesthesia remained stable but end-tidal sevoflurane still dropped. The user placed a finger over the suction port and sevoflurane levels returned to normal. In both cases, the i-gel® was replaced with a laryngeal mask airway.

Link to abstract.