i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

LMA ProSeal® vs. i-Gel® in ventilated children: A randomised, crossover study using the size 2 mask

Gasteiger L, Brimacombe J, Oswald E, Perkhofer D, Tonin A, Keller C, Tiefenthaler W. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 2012; 56(10): 1321-1324

Fifty-one children aged 1.5-6 years, weighing 10-25kg, were studied randomly using either the size 2 LMA ProSeal® or i-gel®. The hypothesis tested was that oropharyngeal leak pressure and fiberoptic position of the airway tube differ between the two devices, with results proving similar.

Link to abstract.

Comparison of size 2.5 i-gelTM with proseal LMATM in anaesthetised, paralyzed children undergoing elective surgery

Mitra S, Das B, Jamil SN. North American Journal Of Medical Sciences 2012; 4(10): 453-7

Investigation on the usefulness of paediatric i-gel® size 2.5 against the PLMA equivalent in 60 randomly assigned patients due for anaesthetised elective surgery. Leak pressure was the primary outcome recorded, with further results for ease of insertion, hemodynamic data and postoperative complications also measured. Most areas offered no significant difference, although i-gel® proved easier to insert and recorded a higher leak pressure. Due to author-defined parameters such as cost-effectiveness, they deduce that i-gel® ‘must be more frequently used’.

Link to abstract.

Randomized comparison of the i-gel®, the LMA Supreme®, and the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D using clinical and fibreoptic assessments in elective patients

Russo SG, Cremer S, Galli T, Eich C, Bräuer A, Crozier TA, Bauer M, Strack M. BMC Anesthesiol 2012; 12: 18

Three groups of 40 elective patients each were assigned to i-gel®, LMA Supreme® and Laryngeal Tube Suction-D for a prospective, randomised and comparative study of position (fibre optic) and clinical performance data during surgery. Speed of insertion and success rates, leak pressure, dynamic airway compliance, and signs of postoperative airway morbidity were recorded, with i-gel® registering a 95% insertion success rate and the highest airway compliance. In conclusion, all devices were considered suitable for ventilation in elective surgery.

Abstract text

 

Randomized crossover comparison of the laryngeal mask airway classic with i-gel® laryngeal mask airway in the management of difficult airway in post burn neck contracture patients

Singh J, Yadav MK, Marahatta SB, Shrestha BL. Indian J Anaesth 2012; 56(4): 348-52

Prospective, crossover, randomised trial of i-gel® against cLMA on 48 post-burn neck contracture patients with reduced neck movement and mouth opening. Primary outcome was overall success rate, with other measurements taken in time to ventilation, leak pressure, fibreoptic view and visualisation of square wave pattern. Success rate for i-gel® was 91.7%, against 79.2% for cLMA. i-gel® outperformed cLMA in all measurements. Authors conclude their study has ‘better clinical performance in the difficult airway management of the airway in the post burn contracture of the neck’.

Link to abstract.

Randomized crossover comparison of the laryngeal

Singh J, Yadav MK, Marahatta SB, Shrestha BL. Indian J Anaesth 2012; 56(4): 348-52

Prospective, crossover, randomised trial of i-gel® against cLMA on 48 post-burn neck contracture patients with reduced neck movement and mouth opening. Primary outcome was overall success rate, with other measurements taken in time to ventilation, leak pressure, fibreoptic view and visualisation of square wave pattern. Success rate for i-gel® was 91.7%, against 79.2% for cLMA. i-gel® outperformed cLMA in all measurements. Authors conclude their study has ‘better clinical performance in the difficult airway management of the airway in the post burn contracture of the neck’.

Abstract text