i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

The use of the i-gel® in a developing country

Piraccini E, Bartolini A, Agnoletti V, Corso R, Gambale G, Vicini C. Am J Emerg Med 2010; 28(7): 840-41

This case report describes the successful use of an i-gel® for a 24-year-old ENT patient in a Columbian hospital. An initial attempt at direct laryngoscopy failed because of a lack of the necessary tools; a size two Miller blade was the only adult blade available. A size three i-gel® was subsequently inserted and immediately established airway patency to facilitate intubation.

Abstract text

The use of an i-gel® supraglottic airway for the airway management of a patient with subglottic stenosis: a case report

Donaldson W, Michalek P. Minerva Anestesiol 2010; 76(5): 369-372

This report details the case of a 47-year-old woman with subglottic stenosis. During preoperative screening she stated that there had been difficulty inserting an endotracheal tube during an earlier procedure. During anaesthesia, a size four i-gel® was inserted on the first attempt. A fibrescope was passed down the i-gel® and into the trachea, where subglottic stenosis could be seen. The i-gel® showed no signs of leaking and did not cause any trauma. The authors note that this is the first case report where an i-gel® has been used in a patient with subglottic stenosis, and state that preoperative tests should be carried out before choosing to use the device in this situation.

Link to abstract.

i-gel® supraglottic airway for rescue airway management and as a conduit for intubation in a patient with acute respiratory failure

Campbell J, Michalek P, Deighan M. Resuscitation 2009; 80(8): 963

This case report details the case of a 54-year-old man with acute respiratory failure, who had a grade four view at laryngoscopy. He was difficult to bag-mask ventilate and a laryngeal mask was inserted as an airway rescue technique. As ventilation was not possible with this device, it was removed and a size four i-gel® inserted. This allowed good ventilation. A fibrescope was passed down the airway channel and a 7.0mm endotracheal tube passed over the fibrescope and through the i-gel®. The i-gel® was then removed, leaving the airway secure.

Link to abstract.

Crossover comparison of the Laryngeal Mask Supreme and the i-gel® in simulated difficult airway scenario in anesthetized patients

Theiler LG, Kleine-Brueggeney M, Kaiser D, Urwyler MD, Luyet C, Vogt A, Greig R, Unibe MME. Anesthesiology 2009; 111(1): 55-62

This study looked at a simulated difficult airway scenario by using a neck collar to limit both mouth opening and neck movement. Both devices were placed in random order in each of 60 patients. The primary outcome was overall success rate. Other measurements included time to successful ventilation, seal pressure, fibreoptic view and adverse events.The authors concluded the two devices tested had a ‘similar insertion success and clinical performance in the simulated difficult airway situation’. The i-gel® enabled better fibreoptic laryngeal view and less epiglottic downfolding.

Link to abstract.

 

 

Use of an i-gel® for airway rescue

Joshi NA, Baird M, Cook TM. Anaesthesia 2008; 63(9): 1010-1026

A middle-aged female patient was scheduled for an elective operation on her hand. She had undergone several general anaesthetics in the past when a cLMA had been used without documented problems. She had a Mallampati score of three and a thyromental distance of 6cm. Face mask ventilation with an oropharyngeal airway was extremely difficult. A pLMA was inserted, but ventilation was not possible. A size four cLMA was also tried with the same result. A size four i-gel® was then inserted. This immediately provided unobstructed ventilation and stable oxygenation saturation of 98%. The authors commented that ‘the i-gel®’s role in difficult airway management remains to be established, but its ease of insertion, short wide airway tube and good airway leak pressures make it a potentially useful airway device in cases of difficult mask ventilation.’

Link to abstract.