i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Supraglottic airways: the history and current state of prehospital airway adjuncts.

Ostermayer DG, Gausche-Hill M. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2014 Jan-Mar;18(1):106-15

Review discussing the history, developments, benefits and complications of supraglottic devices in prehospital care. Devices covered included Laryngeal Mask Airway, Air-Q and i-gel.

Link to abstract

Performance of the i-gel™ during pre-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Häske D, Schempf B, Gaier G, Niederberger C. Resuscitation 2013; 84(9): 1229-32

This observational study of i-gel® use during CPR assessed ease of insertion, ventilation quality, leak and whether ventilation was possible without chest compression interruption. Insertions were attempted by 63 paramedics and seven emergency physicians in pre-hospital CPR, with an overall 90% first-attempt insertion success rate. Insertion was reported as easy in 80% of cases, with the same figure representing cases with no leak recorded. In 74% of cases, continuous chest compression was still possible. The authors say that, ‘the i-gel is an easy supraglottic device to insert and enables adequate ventilation during CPR’.

Link to abstract

Supraglottic airway devices during neonatal resuscitation: An historical perspective, systematic review and meta-analysis of available clinical trials

Schmolzer GM, Agarwal M, Kamlin CO, Davis PG. Resuscitation 2013; 84(6): 722-30

Review of available literature on the use of supraglottic airway devices during neonatal resuscitation. Current evidence suggests that resuscitation with a laryngeal mask is a ‘feasible and safe alternative to mask ventilation in infants’, however further randomised controlled trials are needed.

Abstract text

Pre-hospital transient airway management using the I-gel with sustained spontaneous breathing in different emergency situations

Tiesmeier J, Emmerich M. Minerva Anestesiol. 2013 Feb;79(2):212-3

Three case studies where an i-gel® was used in an emergency situation are presented on the back of the authors’ previous knowledge that this SAD has ‘advantageous characteristics’, including quick insertion time, good seal pressures and high success rates. Cases were: a ‘violent’ but sedated male patient; a 69-year-old patient suffering a cerebral seizure; and an unconscious and intoxicated patient found at home. Regurgitation and aspiration were not seen in any case. Authors conclude that, alongside other pre-clinical emergency situations, i-gel® can be used in cases of sustained spontaneous breathing, and ‘could be considered for extended use outside the hospital’.

Link to abstract.