i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Pre-hospital airway management: The data grows rapidly but controversy remains

Lockey D, Lossius HM. Resuscitation 2014; 85(7): 849-50

An editorial discussing three studies published in the same journal issue covering different aspects of emergency advanced airway management, both out of and inside the hospital.

Link to abstract

 

Introduction of the I-gel supraglottic airway device for prehospital airway management in a UK ambulance service.

Duckett J, Fell P, Han K, Kimber C, Taylor C. Emerg Med J. 2014 Jun;31(6):505-7

Clinical review of the advanced airway management techniques within the North East Ambulance Service in the UK. i-gel a popular choice for airway management during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation, giving higher successful insertion rates than endotracheal tube. Authors conclude that they anticipate i-gel will be the first choice device for use in prehospital cardiac arrest.

Link to abstract

Is an i-gel supraglottic airway useful for airway rescue in the community?

Peutrell I, Jennison N. British Journal of Midwifery 2014 May; 22(5): 254-8

Twenty midwives asked to manage newborn resuscitation scenarios on a manikin using two techniques: Bag valve mask with a Guedel, and a bag with an i-gel. Time to first breath quicker with i-gel, no significant difference in duration of inflation breaths. Higher inflation pressures generated with i-gel.

Link to abstract

Shift of the i-gel position after chest compression: comparison of fixation methods using Durapore tape, Multipore tape, or a fixation strap

Seno H, Komasawa N, Fujiwara S, Miyazaki S, Tatsumi S, Sawai T, Minami T. Masui. 2014 May;63(5):590-3

Manikin study to investigate effectiveness of three fixation methods on an automated chest compressor. Fixation strap may prove useful in stabilising i-gel insertion in this scenario.

Link to abstract

Higher insertion success with the i-gel supraglottic airway in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a randomised controlled trial

Middleton PM, Simpson PM, Thomas RE, Bendall JC. Resuscitation 2014;85(7):893-7

Subjects with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were allocated to either the i-gel or Portex Soft Seal laryngeal mask group, within a large Australian ambulance group. Primary outcome was successful insertion of the airway. The i-gel had a significantly higher success rate than Portex Soft Seal and significantly lower median ease of insertion scores.

Link to abstract