i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Pre-hospital resuscitation using the i-gel®

Thomas M, Benger J. Resuscitation 2009; 80(12): 1437

This correspondence article describes 12 attempts to ventilate patients in cardiac arrest using the i-gel®. The device could usually be inserted on the first attempt; however, on seven out of 12 occasions ventilation was then found to be inadequate. The i-gel®s were correctly positioned, but there were large leaks. The authors state that the reason for this is unclear, but that the device may be harder to position correctly when patients are not in the most appropriate position for insertion. An alternative explanation is that higher pressure is needed to ventilate the lungs after cardiac arrest, in which case other supraglottic airways should have the same problem.

Link to abstract.

Crossover comparison of the Laryngeal Mask Supreme and the i-gel® in simulated difficult airway scenario in anesthetized patients

Theiler LG, Kleine-Brueggeney M, Kaiser D, Urwyler MD, Luyet C, Vogt A, Greig R, Unibe MME. Anesthesiology 2009; 111(1): 55-62

This study looked at a simulated difficult airway scenario by using a neck collar to limit both mouth opening and neck movement. Both devices were placed in random order in each of 60 patients. The primary outcome was overall success rate. Other measurements included time to successful ventilation, seal pressure, fibreoptic view and adverse events.The authors concluded the two devices tested had a ‘similar insertion success and clinical performance in the simulated difficult airway situation’. The i-gel® enabled better fibreoptic laryngeal view and less epiglottic downfolding.

Link to abstract.

 

 

The Supraglottic Airway i-gel® in Comparison with Proseal Laryngeal Mask Airway and Classic Laryngeal Mask Airway in Anaesthetized Patients

Shin W, Cheong Y, Yang H, Nishiyama T. European Journal Of Anaesthesiology 2009; 26: 000-000

167 patients were randomly assigned to device groups. Haemodynamic data, airway leak pressure, leak volume, success rates and postoperative complications were assessed.

Link to abstract.