i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Emergency airway management by paramedics: comparison between standard endotracheal intubation, laryngeal mask airway, and I-gel

Leventis C, Chalkias A, Sampanis M A, Foulidou X, Xanthos T. Eur J Emerg Med. 2014 Oct; 21(5): 371-3

Study to investigate intubation skill levels of 72 paramedics using ETI, LMA and i-gel® in a manikin model. The success rate was higher, and the insertion time lower for those using i-gel®. There was a ‘statistically significant association’ between experience level and insertion time of LMA. Authors conclude that paramedics should ‘lay greater emphasis on airway management using supraglottic devices, especially i-gel®’.

Link to abstract

A comparison of supraglottic airway i-gel™ vs. classic laryngeal mask airway in small children.

Lee JH, Cho HS, Shin WJ, Yang HS. Korean J Anesthesiol. 2014 Feb;66(2):127-30.

Airway sealing ability, success rate of insertion and adverse events were among the recorded outcomes in this study. Leak pressures and insertion success rates are similar between the two devices, however the i-gel slid out of the mouth of a small amount of patients in this scenario. Authors recommend the device should be secured more tightly.

Link to abstract.

Supraglottic airways: the history and current state of prehospital airway adjuncts.

Ostermayer DG, Gausche-Hill M. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2014 Jan-Mar;18(1):106-15

Review discussing the history, developments, benefits and complications of supraglottic devices in prehospital care. Devices covered included Laryngeal Mask Airway, Air-Q and i-gel.

Link to abstract

Randomized crossover comparison of the laryngeal mask airway classic with i-gel® laryngeal mask airway in the management of difficult airway in post burn neck contracture patients

Singh J, Yadav MK, Marahatta SB, Shrestha BL. Indian J Anaesth 2012; 56(4): 348-52

Prospective, crossover, randomised trial of i-gel® against cLMA on 48 post-burn neck contracture patients with reduced neck movement and mouth opening. Primary outcome was overall success rate, with other measurements taken in time to ventilation, leak pressure, fibreoptic view and visualisation of square wave pattern. Success rate for i-gel® was 91.7%, against 79.2% for cLMA. i-gel® outperformed cLMA in all measurements. Authors conclude their study has ‘better clinical performance in the difficult airway management of the airway in the post burn contracture of the neck’.

Link to abstract.

Randomized crossover comparison of the laryngeal

Singh J, Yadav MK, Marahatta SB, Shrestha BL. Indian J Anaesth 2012; 56(4): 348-52

Prospective, crossover, randomised trial of i-gel® against cLMA on 48 post-burn neck contracture patients with reduced neck movement and mouth opening. Primary outcome was overall success rate, with other measurements taken in time to ventilation, leak pressure, fibreoptic view and visualisation of square wave pattern. Success rate for i-gel® was 91.7%, against 79.2% for cLMA. i-gel® outperformed cLMA in all measurements. Authors conclude their study has ‘better clinical performance in the difficult airway management of the airway in the post burn contracture of the neck’.

Abstract text