i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

A cohort evaluation of the paediatric i-gel® airway during anaesthesia in 120 children

Beringer R, Kelly F, Cook T, Nolan J, Hardy R, Simpson T, White M. Anaesthesia 2012; 66(12): 1121-1126

120 children up to 13 years of age were studied using the paediatric i-gel® during general anaesthesia to assess efficacy and usability. Insertion success and number of attempts, ventilation, leak pressure and fibreoptic view were all recorded. Airway manipulations and complications were also noted. In 94% of children the i-gel® was inserted and a clear airway maintained without complication.

Link to abstract.

Insertion of six different supraglottic airway devices whilst wearing chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-personal protective equipment: a manikin study

Castle N, Pillay Y, Spencer N. Anaesthesia 2011; 66(11): 983-8

Six different supraglottic airway devices, including i-gel®, were tested by 58 paramedics for speed and ease of insertion in a manikin, whilst wearing either a standard uniform or chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-person protective equipment (CBRN-PPE). During the latter test, i-gel® was the fastest of the six to insert with a mean insertion time of 19 seconds. Overall, the wearing of CBRN-PPE has a detrimental effect on insertion time of supraglottic airways.

Link to abstract.

 

 

 

The use of i-gel® extraglottic airway during percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy: a case series

Corso RM, Piraccini E, Agnoletti V, Baccanelli M, Coffa A, Gambale G. Minerva Anaestesiol 2011; 77(8): 852-3

The i-gel® was used in eight patients for tracheostomy. Patients were extubated and the ET tube was replaced with the i-gel®. A percutaneous tracheostomy kit was then advanced to the second tracheal ring and the procedure was performed. Arterial pressure, PaO2/FiO2, minute ventilation and airway pressure were measured before, during and after tracheostomy. There were no significant differences in ventilatory and haemodynamic parameters. Use of the i-gel® was successful in seven of eight patients. The i-gel® provided better views of the glottis compared to the cLMA and ventilation was comparable to the ET tube. Large trials must take place to determine whether a one in eight failure rate remains.

Abstract text

The influence of head and neck position on ventilation with the i-gel® airway in paralysed, anaesthetised patients

Sanuki T, Uda R, Sugioka S, Daigo E, Son H, Akatsuka M, Kotani J. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2011 Aug;28(8):597-9

20 adult patients scheduled for oral surgery were ventilated using the i-gel®. Leak pressure, ventilation score and fibreoptic view were measured with the patient’s head and neck in neutral position, extended position, flexion and rotated to the right. Leak pressure was higher during flexion, lower during extension and comparable to neutral position during rotation. Ventilation score was significantly worse during flexion. Fibreoptic view was not affected by head and neck position. The authors recommend that the i-gel® is not used in cases where head and neck flexion is likely, but they state that it is otherwise suitable for surgery where the head is moved.

Link to abstract.

 

Randomized clinical trial of the i-gel® and Magill tracheal tube or single-use ILMA® and ILMA® tracheal tube for blind intubation in anaesthetized patients with a predicted difficult airway.

Theiler L, Kleine-Brueggeney M, Urwyler N, Graf T, Luyet C, Greif R. Br J Anaesth 2011; 107(2): 243-250

A prospective, randomised, controlled trial comparing the success rate of blind tracheal intubation with a Magill PVC tube through i-gel®. Corresponding tracheal tube was introduced under fibreoptic visualization, but without guidance. Primary outcome was intubation success rate.

Abstract text