i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Abandoning use of 1st generation SAD - Throwing the baby out with the bathwater?

Original post by Pearson K. Reply by Cook TM. Anaesthesia Correspondence Website. 2016. Accessed 22 May.

In the original post, and in response to Cook's study on abandoning vintage laryngeal masks (Br J Anaesth. 2015 Oct;115(4):497-9), Pearson cautions against the 'universal replacement of 1st generation devices' especially considering sub-group care (paediatrics), versatility, training and cost, and instead suggests there should not be a one-size-fits-all approach. Pearson also comments on the significant move towards the use of i-gel in her hospital.

In response to this, Cook suggests clinicians use the best performing and safest device where available as first choice. Cook makes mention of the two published meta-analyses on i-gel in children: by Choi GJ and Maitra S.

Link to abstract

The Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines and the sacred cows of routine airway management

Cook TM, Kelly FE. Anaesthesia. 2016 Apr;71(4):466-7

Based on the findings of the DAS 2015 guidelines, the authors argue that evidence suggests 2nd generation supraglottic airway devices perform better than 1st generation equivalents, and that 2nd gen should be used for airway rescue and routine airway management.

Link to abstract

Third generation supraglottic airway devices: an undefined concept and misused term. Time for an updated classification of supraglottic airway devices

Cook TM. Br J Anaesth. 2015 Oct;115(4):633-4

Letter to the editor recommending that the term 'third generation' used when describing supraglottic airway devices is abandoned due to the confusion over the design features that determine the device's advancement. The author makes further suggestion as to how devices should be classified.

Link to abstract

Evaluation of four airway training manikins as patient simulators for the insertion of eight types of supraglottic airway devices

Jackson KM, Cook TM. Anaesthesia. 2007 Apr;62(4):388-93

The airway arm of this trial compared devices including i-gel, Cobra, SLIPA and Laryngeal Tube Suction II. Each device was inserted twice into each manikin by ten anaesthetists, with each insertion scored and ranked. No one manikin outranked the others for all devices. i-gel insertion was 'significantly the easiest'.

Link to abstract