i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Comparison of i-gel™ and laryngeal mask airway in anesthetized paralyzed patients

Reza Hashemian SM, Nouraei N, Razavi SS, Zaker E, Jafari A, Eftekhari P, Radmand G, Mohajerani SA, Radpay B. Int J Crit Illn Inj Sci. 2014 Oct-Dec;4(4):288-92

64 patients assigned to either i-gel or cLMA groups in this randomised controlled trial. Results showed i-gel was 'significantly' quicker to insert.

Link to abstract

Nasopharyngeal airway as an aid to remove i-gel™ after endotracheal intubation through the device

Sen I, Bhardwaj N, Latha Y. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol. 2014 Oct;30(4):572-3

Use of NPA to aid removal of i-gel was evaluated in 20 adult patients - in 17 the device was inserted at the first attempt. No complications such as gagging and laryngospasm were noted during insertion or removal of i-gel.

Link to abstract

Emergency airway management by paramedics: comparison between standard endotracheal intubation, laryngeal mask airway, and I-gel

Leventis C, Chalkias A, Sampanis M A, Foulidou X, Xanthos T. Eur J Emerg Med. 2014 Oct; 21(5): 371-3

Study to investigate intubation skill levels of 72 paramedics using ETI, LMA and i-gel® in a manikin model. The success rate was higher, and the insertion time lower for those using i-gel®. There was a ‘statistically significant association’ between experience level and insertion time of LMA. Authors conclude that paramedics should ‘lay greater emphasis on airway management using supraglottic devices, especially i-gel®’.

Link to abstract

Emergency airway management by paramedics: comparison between standard endotracheal intubation, laryngeal mask airway, and I-gel

Leventis C, Chalkias A, Sampanis MA, Foulidou X, Xanthos T. Eur J Emerg Med. 2014 Oct;21(5):371-3

72 briefly-trained paramedics were allocated to intubate a manikin. Success rate was higher, and insertion time 'significantly' shorter for the i-gel group.

Link to abstract

 

Evaluation of chest compression effect on airway management with air-Q®, aura-i®, i-gel®, and Fastrack® intubating supraglottic devices by novice physicians: a randomized crossover simulation study

Komasawa N, Ueki R, Kaminoh Y, Nishi SI. J Anesth 2014; 28(5): 676-80

A group of 20 novice physicians inserted the named devices into manikins with or without chest compressions, whereupon insertion time and successful ventilation rate were measured. In cases of successful ventilation, blind tracheal intubation via the inserted device was performed. Chest compression did not significantly decrease ventilation success rates in each device, however insertion time with i-gel® did suffer, according to the authors.

Link to abstract