i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Reverse technique for i-gel® supraglottic airway insertion

Sen I, Bhardwaj N, Latha YS. J Anaesth Clin Pharmacol 2013; 29: 128-9

Case reported of tongue folding during procedure on a 30-year-old woman. Usual insertion technique did not provide a patent airway, so the authors confirm they used a reverse technique - proving successful. Authors conclude the technique was atraumatic and may be a suitable back-up.

Abstract text

Failed tracheal intubation in obstetric anaesthesia: 2 yr national case–control study in the UK

Quinn AC, Milne D, Columb M, Gorton H and Knight M. Br J Anaesth. 2013 Jan;110(1):74-80

The purpose of this UK-wide study was to further evaluate the predetermined rate that one in 250 obstetric patients suffer failed intubation whilst undergoing general anaesthesia. Due to the lack of national figures, the study used the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS) of data collection in centres across the UK to record incidence, risk factors and any reports of failed intubations. All contacted centres responded, equalling 57 completed reports, giving a unit-based estimation of one case in every 224 patients. Univariate analyses also recorded in detail in this report.

Link to abstract.

 

 

Tracheal intubation with a camera embedded in the tube tip (VivasightTM)

Huitink JM, Koopman EM, Bouwman RA, Craenen A, Verwoert M, Krage R, Visser IE, Erwteman M, van Groeningen D, Tijink R and Schauer A. Anaesthesia. 2013 Jan;68(1):74-8

Study on tracheal intubation in manikins and patients with a camera embedded in the tip of the tracheal tube Vivasight™ pre-loaded in a size 5 i-gel®. All attempted intubations were successful, with a mean time of 1.4 seconds, and was faster when compared to intubation via LMA®.

Link to abstract.

 

Pulmonary aspiration associated with supraglottic airways: Proseal laryngeal mask airway and I-gel

Kim YH. Korean J Anesthesiol 2012; 63(6): 489-490

Review assessing the use of SGAs in patients with increased risk of aspiration, focusing on five devices and the evidence to date. Provides a review of the common features of SGAs, including i-gel®, and the benefits they may bring. Author appears critical of the practice of using these devices, however later states that pulmonary aspiration may occur more through user error rather than device failure.

Abstract text

 

Magnetic resonance imaging study of the in vivo position of the extraglottic airway devices i-gel® and LMA Supreme® in anaesthetized human volunteers

Russo SG, Cremer S, Eich C, Jipp M, Cohnen J, Strack M, Quintel M & Mohr A. BR J Anaesth 2012; 109(6): 996-1004

This randomized cross-over study of 12 volunteer patients was conducted primarily to measure the in situ position of the LMA Supreme® and i-gel® via MRI scan. Position was also assessed functionally and optically by fibrescope. Results showed that the devices differed significantly: the LMA Supreme® protruded deeper into the oesophageal sphincter, whilst i-gel® caused greater compression of the tongue. Glottic aperture reduction and hyoid bone displacement were also measured. Authors deem the results relevent to the risk of aspiration, glottic narrowing, airway resistance and soft-tissue morbidity.

Link to abstract.