i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Should supraglottic airway devices be used by lifeguards at all?

Baker P, Webber J. Anaesthesia 2014; 69(8): 928-9

A further response to Adelborg et al (Anaesthesia. 2014 Apr;69(4):343-7), expressing concern at this being a manikin study, and suggesting that the “vital issue” is whether a device is “fit for purpose” in the case of a drowning patient.

Link to abstract

A reply

Lofgren B, Adelborg K. Anaesthesia 2014; 69(8): 929-30

A response to the two concerns raised by McKenna (Anaesthesia 2014; 69(8): 928) and Baker (Anaesthesia 2014; 69(8): 928-9), acknowledging that more studies are needed and that there is currently “insufficient evidence” to recommend any specific ventilation technique among lifeguards. They also reiterate their study conclusions.

Link to abstract

Comparison of supraglottic devices i-gel(®) and LMA Fastrach(®) as conduit for endotracheal intubation

Kapoor S, Jethava DD, Gupta P, Jethava D, Kumar A. Indian J Anaesth. 2014 Jul;58(4):397-402.

Two randomised groups were assigned either device and after insertion, blind tracheal intubation was attempted. Success at first attempt and overall intubation success rates were assessed. Authors concluded that the i-gel is 'a better device' for rescue ventilation.

Link to abstract.

Pre-hospital airway management: The data grows rapidly but controversy remains

Lockey D, Lossius HM. Resuscitation 2014; 85(7): 849-50

An editorial discussing three studies published in the same journal issue covering different aspects of emergency advanced airway management, both out of and inside the hospital.

Link to abstract

 

A comparison of surfactant administration through i-gel and ET-tube in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome in newborns weighing more than 2000 grams.

Sadeghnia A, Tanhaei M, Mohammadizadeh M, Nemati M. Adv Biomed Res. 2014 Jul 31;3:160

Randomised control trial on newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, comparing administration of surfactant. Results show that administration using i-gel was more successful than control group and 'could even be promoted to standard care position'. More research needed.

Link to abstract