i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Consensus guidelines for managing the airway in patients with COVID ‐19

Cook TM, El-Boghdadly K, McGuire B, McNarry AF, Patel A, Higgs A. Anaesthesia 2020 Jun; 75(6): 785-799

 

 

Severe acute respiratory syndrome‐corona virus‐2, which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19), is highly contagious. Airway management of patients with COVID‐19 is high risk to staff and patients. We aimed to develop principles for airway management of patients with COVID‐19 to encourage safe, accurate and swift performance. This consensus statement has been brought together at short notice to advise on airway management for patients with COVID‐19, drawing on published literature and immediately available information from clinicians and experts. Recommendations on the prevention of contamination of healthcare workers, the choice of staff involved in airway management, the training required and the selection of equipment are discussed. The fundamental principles of airway management in these settings are described for: emergency tracheal intubation; predicted or unexpected difficult tracheal intubation; cardiac arrest; anaesthetic care; and tracheal extubation. We provide figures to support clinicians in safe airway management of patients with COVID‐19. The advice in this document is designed to be adapted in line with local workplace policies.

Link to abstract

Comparison of two supraglottic airway devices: i-gel airway and ProSeal laryngeal mask airway following digital insertion in nonparalyzed anesthetized patients

Luthra A, Chauhan R, Jain A, Bhukal I, Mahajan S, Bala I. Anesth Essays Res. 2019 Oct-Dec;13(4):669-675

This prospective randomized observational study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of the i-gel as compared to the ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) in non-paralysed anaesthetised patients. 40 ASA I-II patients, between 18 and 65 years of age, undergoing elective surgery were randomly allocated to either the i-gel or the PLMA. Observed parameters included insertion time, ease of insertion, number of attempts, failed insertion, airway reaction during insertion, oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP), and gastric insufflation. Additionally, fibreoptic view of the channels of the devices and ease of insertion of Ryle's tube through the gastric drain channel and complications were also assessed. Results showed that both devices had a similar performance in terms of first attempt, overall insertion success rates and insertion times. On the other hand, the Ryle's tube passage was easier through the i-gel. Full view of the vocal cords was achieved in 17 patients intubated using the i-gel and 9 using the PLMA. In addition, the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat and hoarseness was higher in the PLMA group. Thus, the i-gel provides superior approach in this type of patient as it is able to achieve a better positioning over the laryngeal framework and oesophagus while allowing an easier passage of the Ryle's tube through its drain channel as compared to the PLMA.

Link to abstract.

Comparison of i-gel as a conduit for intubation between under fibreoptic guidance and blind endotracheal intubation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized simulation study

Choi HY, Kim W, Jang YS, Kang GH, Kim JG, Kim H. Emerg Med Int. 2019 Oct 31;2019:8913093

This prospective randomized crossover manikin study investigated the intubation performance of I-gel blind intubation (IGI) in comparison to I-gel bronchoscopic intubation (IBRI) and intubation using Macintosh Laryngoscope (MCL). 23 emergency physicians carried out intubations with two different types of ET tubes while performing chest compressions. Assessed outcomes included intubation time (primary) cumulative success rate for each intubation time was significantly shorter as compared to the IBRI and MCL using both ET tubes. On the other hand, the performance of polyvinyl chloride and wire reinforced silicon tubes were comparable for each intubation technique. Moreover, the IGI approach reached 100% intubation success rate in a significantly shorter amount of time as compared to the other techniques. Therefore, the IGI technique is a safe and effective approach when carrying out intubations in emergency scenarios that can be used by experienced intubators when administering chest compressions.

Link to abstract.

Comparative study of fiber-optic guided tracheal intubation through intubating laryngeal mask airway LMA FastrachTM and i-gel in adult paralyzed patients

Sood S, Saxena A, Thakur A, Chahar S. Saudi J Anaesth. 2019 Oct-Dec; 13(4): 290–294.

This prospective randomised study aimed to compare the performance of two supraglottic airway devices (SADs) the i-gel and LMA Fastrach when performing fiberoptic-guided intubation in adult paralysed patients. 60 patients were randomly assigned to either i-gel or LMA Fastrach. Several parameters were assessed, which included ease and time taken for fiberoptic-guided intubation (primary outcome), time taken for successful SAD placement, ease of insertion, ease and time of removal, as well as haemodynamic parameters and postoperative complication (secondary outcomes). Findings demonstrated that the Fastrach had a faster tracheal intubation and higher airway sealing pressure. On the other hand, the ETT was easier to insert when using the i-gel as compared to the Fastrach. Haemodynamic parameters were comparable between both devices. In addition, post removal complications were observed in either devices. Therefore, both devices are comparable in terms of performance and efficacy facilitating fiberoptic-guided intubation in adult paralysed patients.

Link to abstract.

Comparative evaluation of I-gel vs. endotracheal intubation for adequacy of ventilation in pediatric patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries

Kohli M, Wadhawan S, Bhadoria P, Ratan SK. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Jan-Mar;35(1):30-35

This study aimed to determine the efficacy of the i-gel as compared to the ETT in terms of adequacy of ventilation in 80 children (2-8 years of age) undergoing paediatric laparoscopic surgeries. Several parameters were evaluated including peak airway pressure, end-tidal CO2, minute ventilation, SpO2, as well as desufflation of the peritoneal cavity. These variables were recorded after securing the airway, after carboperitoneum (CP) and after desufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Results showed a significant increase in the partial pressure of mean expired CO2 (PeCo2), peak airway pressure, as well as minute ventilation in both groups after creation of CP. On the other hand, no difference was observed in heart rate or mean arterial pressure. Moreover, the i-gel showed a smaller increase in peak airway pressure and fewer post-operative complications. Thus, both devices were comparable in terms of adequacy of ventilation, but the i-gel was able to provide a safe alternative to the ETT.

Link to abstract.