i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Comparison of learning performance of 2 intubating laryngeal mask airways in novice: A randomized crossover manikin study.

Liu ZJ, Yi J, Chen WY, Zhang XH, Huang YG. Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 May;96(19):e6905.

46 doctors with no intubation experience were given 20 minutes of airway training and a short practice session with the i-gel and Aura-I. They were then asked to insert each device into a manikin in random order and to attempt intubation through each airway. Time to ventilation, first-attempt and overall intubation success, incidence of gastric inflation, ease of insertion, view of the vocal cords, and insertion score were all recorded and compared. Participants attempted the same tasks at a 3-month follow-up session. First-attempt and overall success rates for intubation were high and comparable, with only 1 patient failing to intubate via the Aura-I at follow-up. Performance of the devices was generally comparable. Time to intubation was shorter with the i-gel at both time points. Participants also reported that the i-gel was easier to use. These results may be due to the lack of inflatable cuff.

Link to abstract

Evaluation of the efficacy of six supraglottic devices for airway management in dark conditions: a crossover randomized simulation trial

Ohchi F, Komasawa N, Imagawa K, Okamoto K, Minami T. J Anesth. 2015 Dec;29(6):887-92

15 novice doctors and 17 with >2 years experience were asked to insert each airway device into a manikin in random order. This was done in a windowless room with all the lights on and again with the lights switched off. Insertion time, insertion success, and participant's own perception of ease of use were all recorded. Ventilation success was lower in both groups when using the ProSeal and cLMA in the dark. Insertion time for these devices was longer in the dark, an effect that was also seen in both groups. Both ProSeal and cLMA were rated as more difficult to use in the dark compared with light conditions and with other devices. These results are thought to be due to the difference in design between these airways and the others used in the study, which are stiffer and anatomically shaped.

Link to abstract

Laryngoscopy facilitates successful i-gel insertion by novice doctors: a prospective randomized controlled trial

Miyazaki Y, Komasawa N, Matsunami S, Kusaka Y, Minami T. J Anesth. 2015;29(5):654-9

Trial on 84 adults assigned to either laryngoscopy or control groups, with number of attempts to successful insertion and difficulty of insertion the primary outcomes measured. Results suggest that laryngoscopy facilitates i-gel insertion by novice doctors.

Link to abstract

Comparison of five 2nd-generation supraglottic airway devices for airway management performed by novice military operators

Henlin T, Sotak M, Kovaricek P, Tyll T, Balcarek L, Michalek P. Biomed Res Int. 2015;201

Prospective, randomised, single-blinded study comparing five supraglottic airway devices (ProSeal LMA, Supreme LMA, SLIPA, Laryngeal Tube Suction-D and i-gel) in low light conditions on 505 patients after induction of general anaesthesia. Insertion time was shortest in Supreme LMA and i-gel groups.

Link to abstract

Simulation analysis of three intubating supraglottic devices during infant chest compression

Kohama H, Komasawa N, Ueki R, Kaminoh Y, Nishi S. Pediatr Int. 2015;57(1):180-2

Study on performance of air-Q, Ambu Aura-i and i-gel in a manikin simulation, undertaken by 22 novice physicians. Rate of success and insertion time with and without chest compressions were measured.

Link to abstract