i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Current UK practice of pediatric supraglottic airway devices – a survey of members of the Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland

Bradley AE, White MC, Engelhardt T, Bayley G, Beringer RM. Paediatr Anaesth. 2013 Nov;23(11):1006-9

In this survey distributed to the members of APAGBI, the current usage of supraglottic airway devices in routine practice and difficult airways in the UK was assessed. Of the 244 members, 88% preferred the use of first-generation devices, with the most important design feature being the availability of a complete range of sizes. 77% would like to see more randomised controlled trials on SAD safety in children.

Link to abstract.

The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using supraglottic airways and intraosseous devices: a simulation trial

Reiter DA, Strother CG, Weingart SD. Resuscitation 2013; 84(1): 93-7

Emergency Medicine residents split into teams took part in two simulated ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrests using a high fidelity simulator, testing whether use of a laryngeal mask airway improved resuscitation results. Time to airway placement, duration and success rate of airway placement and percent hands off time were among results measured. Authors conclude that use of a laryngeal mask and an IO device led to ‘significantly faster establishment of an airway’

Abstract

Comparison of clinical performance of the I-gel® with LMA Proseal®

Chauhan G, Nayar P, Seth A, Gupta K, Panwar M, Agrawal N. J Anaesth Clin Pharmacol 2013; 29(1): 56-60

Prospective, randomised study conducted in 80 fasted patients, split equally between i-gel® and PLMA, of ASA grades I/II. Ease and speed of insertions were primary outcomes measured, with i-gel® significantly quicker and easier than PLMA. Post-operative complications also lower in i-gel® group.

Link to abstract

Failed tracheal intubation in obstetric anaesthesia: 2 yr national case–control study in the UK

Quinn AC, Milne D, Columb M, Gorton H and Knight M. Br J Anaesth. 2013 Jan;110(1):74-80

The purpose of this UK-wide study was to further evaluate the predetermined rate that one in 250 obstetric patients suffer failed intubation whilst undergoing general anaesthesia. Due to the lack of national figures, the study used the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS) of data collection in centres across the UK to record incidence, risk factors and any reports of failed intubations. All contacted centres responded, equalling 57 completed reports, giving a unit-based estimation of one case in every 224 patients. Univariate analyses also recorded in detail in this report.

Link to abstract.

 

 

Tracheal intubation with a camera embedded in the tube tip (VivasightTM)

Huitink JM, Koopman EM, Bouwman RA, Craenen A, Verwoert M, Krage R, Visser IE, Erwteman M, van Groeningen D, Tijink R and Schauer A. Anaesthesia. 2013 Jan;68(1):74-8

Study on tracheal intubation in manikins and patients with a camera embedded in the tip of the tracheal tube Vivasight™ pre-loaded in a size 5 i-gel®. All attempted intubations were successful, with a mean time of 1.4 seconds, and was faster when compared to intubation via LMA®.

Link to abstract.