i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Comparison of learning performance of 2 intubating laryngeal mask airways in novice: A randomized crossover manikin study.

Liu ZJ, Yi J, Chen WY, Zhang XH, Huang YG. Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 May;96(19):e6905.

46 doctors with no intubation experience were given 20 minutes of airway training and a short practice session with the i-gel and Aura-I. They were then asked to insert each device into a manikin in random order and to attempt intubation through each airway. Time to ventilation, first-attempt and overall intubation success, incidence of gastric inflation, ease of insertion, view of the vocal cords, and insertion score were all recorded and compared. Participants attempted the same tasks at a 3-month follow-up session. First-attempt and overall success rates for intubation were high and comparable, with only 1 patient failing to intubate via the Aura-I at follow-up. Performance of the devices was generally comparable. Time to intubation was shorter with the i-gel at both time points. Participants also reported that the i-gel was easier to use. These results may be due to the lack of inflatable cuff.

Link to abstract

Are nurses able to perform blind intubation? Randomized comparison of I-gel and laryngeal mask airway

Ladny JR, Bielski K, Szarpak L, Cieciel M, Konski R, Smereka J. Am J Emerg Med. 2017 May; 35(5): 786-787

Manikin study to assess effectiveness of blind intubation through the i-gel, LMA Classic and a standard cuffed tracheal tube, performed by 34 nurses in CPR conditions across two scenarios (with and without chest compressions). Primary measure was time to intubation. i-gel recorded a lower median time to intubation and higher, statistically significant, successful insertion rates in both scenarios. Performing compressions doesn't significantly affect time to perform blind intubation in this setting, but reduces the effectiveness of first intubation attempt. i-gel was faster in both scenarios.

Link to abstract.

Competence in the use of supraglottic airways by Australian surf lifesavers for cardiac arrest ventilation in a manikin

Holbery-Morgan L, Angel C, Murphy M, Carew J, Douglas F, Murphy R, Hood N, Rechtman A, Scarff C, Simpson N, Stewardson A, Steinfort D, Radford S, Douglas N, Johnson D. Emerg Med Australas. 2017 Feb;29(1):63-68

Lifesavers in Australia who already use pocket masks and BVMs were trained to use the LMA and i-gel on a manikin. Time to effective ventilation was similar between the pocket mask, BVM and i-gel, but longer for LMA. Authors feel there is a limited role for supraglottic airway devices in this scenario.

Link to abstract.

Tracheal intubation through I-gel performed during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz M, Majer J. Am J Emerg Med. 2017 Jan 16.

Manikin study to compare the efficacy of ETI performed by 27 nurses using the i-gel as a guide with/without chest compressions. Results showed that in this scenario, nurses were able to perform blind intubation using the i-gel with 'high efficiency'.

Link to abstract.

Comparison of the i-gel and other supraglottic airways in adult manikin studies: systematic review and meta-analysis

An J, Nam SB, Lee JS, Lee J, Yoo H, Lee HM, Kim MS. Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Jan;96(1):e5801

Authors conducted a specialised search of study databases for eligible randomised controlled trials, setting device insertion time and first-attempt insertion success rate as their primary outcomes. In the 14 RCTs included, i-gel was faster than the majority of other supraglottic airways, with only three others recording shorter insertion times. Authors concluded that the 'unapparent advantage' of insertion success rate indicated the need for further evidence gathering in this area.

Link to abstract.