i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

i-gel® supraglottic airway in clinical practice: a prospective observational multicentre study

Theiler L, Gutzmann M, Kleine-Brueggeney M, Urwyler N, Kaempfen B, Greif R. Br J Anaesth 2012; 109(6): 990-995

Over a period of 24 months, 2049 uses of the i-gel® were measured across five independent hospitals in Switzerland to evaluate insertion success rates, leak pressures, adverse events, and risk factors for failure. Patients’ mean age was 47 years. The authors concluded that the i-gel® is a reliable device, failing in less than 5% of patients and providing high leak pressures. Serious adverse events are rare.

Abstract text

 

 

Magnetic resonance imaging study of the in vivo position of the extraglottic airway devices i-gel® and LMA Supreme® in anaesthetized human volunteers

Russo SG, Cremer S, Eich C, Jipp M, Cohnen J, Strack M, Quintel M & Mohr A. BR J Anaesth 2012; 109(6): 996-1004

This randomized cross-over study of 12 volunteer patients was conducted primarily to measure the in situ position of the LMA Supreme® and i-gel® via MRI scan. Position was also assessed functionally and optically by fibrescope. Results showed that the devices differed significantly: the LMA Supreme® protruded deeper into the oesophageal sphincter, whilst i-gel® caused greater compression of the tongue. Glottic aperture reduction and hyoid bone displacement were also measured. Authors deem the results relevent to the risk of aspiration, glottic narrowing, airway resistance and soft-tissue morbidity.

Link to abstract.

 

Randomized clinical trial of the i-gel® and Magill tracheal tube or single-use ILMA® and ILMA® tracheal tube for blind intubation in anaesthetized patients with a predicted difficult airway.

Theiler L, Kleine-Brueggeney M, Urwyler N, Graf T, Luyet C, Greif R. Br J Anaesth 2011; 107(2): 243-250

A prospective, randomised, controlled trial comparing the success rate of blind tracheal intubation with a Magill PVC tube through i-gel®. Corresponding tracheal tube was introduced under fibreoptic visualization, but without guidance. Primary outcome was intubation success rate.

Abstract text

 

Randomized trial comparing the i-gel® and Magill tracheal tube with the single-use ILMA® and ILMA® tracheal tube for fibreoptic-guided intubation in anaesthetized patients with a predicted difficult airway

Kleine-Brueggeney M, Theiler L, Urwyler B, Vogt A, Greif R. Br J Anaesth 2011; 107(2): 251-7

A prospective, randomised, controlled trial comparing the success rate of fibreoptic-guided tracheal intubation using Rüsch® PVC tracheal tube through i-gel® with sILMATM tracheal tube through sILMATM. First-attempt success rate was primary outcome. 96% of 76 patients were successful using i-gel®, compared to 90% of 71 in the sILMATM group.

Abstract text

National census of airway management techniques used for anaesthesia in the UK: first phase of the Fourth National Audit Project at the Royal College of Anaesthetists

Woodall NM, Cook TM. Br J Anaesth 2011; 106 (2): 266-271

There are 309 NHS hospitals that carry out surgery. In this study, a volunteer from each of these hospitals reported the main airway management technique used in every general anaesthetic within a specified two-week period. This data was then used to estimate the annual use of various airway devices. The total number of procedures was 114,904, leading to an annual estimate of 2.9 million. Supraglottic airways were used in 56.2% of cases. The i-gel® was the second most popular choice of supraglottic airway with 4,574 cases. This equates to 7.1% of supraglottic airways and 4% of all devices used.

Abstract text