i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Evaluation of a new supraglottic airway device in ambulatory surgery: the I-gel

Jaoua H, Djaziri L, Bousselmi J, Belhouane H, Skander R, Ben Maamer A, Cherif A, Ben Fadhel K. Tunis Med. 2014 Apr;92(4):239-44

100 patients scheduled for short duration elective surgery were included, with ease of insertion, leak fraction, gastric leak, complications and ease of insertion among the parameters measured. Success rate of insertion was 99%, with first-attempt success at 92%. Authors conclude that the I-gel can be used 'safely and effectively'.

Link to abstract

Pre-hospital transient airway management using the I-gel with sustained spontaneous breathing in different emergency situations

Tiesmeier J, Emmerich M. Minerva Anestesiol. 2013 Feb;79(2):212-3

Three case studies where an i-gel® was used in an emergency situation are presented on the back of the authors’ previous knowledge that this SAD has ‘advantageous characteristics’, including quick insertion time, good seal pressures and high success rates. Cases were: a ‘violent’ but sedated male patient; a 69-year-old patient suffering a cerebral seizure; and an unconscious and intoxicated patient found at home. Regurgitation and aspiration were not seen in any case. Authors conclude that, alongside other pre-clinical emergency situations, i-gel® can be used in cases of sustained spontaneous breathing, and ‘could be considered for extended use outside the hospital’.

Link to abstract.

The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using supraglottic airways and intraosseous devices: a simulation trial

Reiter DA, Strother CG, Weingart SD. Resuscitation 2013; 84(1): 93-7

Emergency Medicine residents split into teams took part in two simulated ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrests using a high fidelity simulator, testing whether use of a laryngeal mask airway improved resuscitation results. Time to airway placement, duration and success rate of airway placement and percent hands off time were among results measured. Authors conclude that use of a laryngeal mask and an IO device led to ‘significantly faster establishment of an airway’

Abstract

Use of cardiocerebral resuscitation or AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines is associated with improved survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Salmen M, Ewy G, Sasson C. BMJ Open 2012; 3: 2(5)

Collating data from 12 observational studies on the topic, covering both guidelines, the aim was to investigate the effect of both methods of treatment on cardiac arrest patients. Authors concluded that there is an ‘association with improved survival’ when cardiocerebral (CCR) protocols or 2005 Guidelines are compared with older versions, and that CCR appears to be a ‘promising resuscitation protocol for Emergency Medical Services’.

Abstract text

Insertion of six different supraglottic airway devices whilst wearing chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-personal protective equipment: a manikin study

Castle N, Pillay Y, Spencer N. Anaesthesia 2011; 66(11): 983-8

Six different supraglottic airway devices, including i-gel®, were tested by 58 paramedics for speed and ease of insertion in a manikin, whilst wearing either a standard uniform or chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-person protective equipment (CBRN-PPE). During the latter test, i-gel® was the fastest of the six to insert with a mean insertion time of 19 seconds. Overall, the wearing of CBRN-PPE has a detrimental effect on insertion time of supraglottic airways.

Link to abstract.