i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Emergency airway management by paramedics: comparison between standard endotracheal intubation, laryngeal mask airway, and I-gel

Leventis C, Chalkias A, Sampanis MA, Foulidou X, Xanthos T. Eur J Emerg Med. 2014 Oct;21(5):371-3

72 briefly-trained paramedics were allocated to intubate a manikin. Success rate was higher, and insertion time 'significantly' shorter for the i-gel group.

Link to abstract

 

Emergency airway management by paramedics: comparison between standard endotracheal intubation, laryngeal mask airway, and I-gel

Leventis C, Chalkias A, Sampanis M A, Foulidou X, Xanthos T. Eur J Emerg Med. 2014 Oct; 21(5): 371-3

Study to investigate intubation skill levels of 72 paramedics using ETI, LMA and i-gel® in a manikin model. The success rate was higher, and the insertion time lower for those using i-gel®. There was a ‘statistically significant association’ between experience level and insertion time of LMA. Authors conclude that paramedics should ‘lay greater emphasis on airway management using supraglottic devices, especially i-gel®’.

Link to abstract

Higher insertion success with the i-gel supraglottic airway in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a randomised controlled trial

Middleton PM, Simpson PM, Thomas RE, Bendall JC. Resuscitation 2014;85(7):893-7

Subjects with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were allocated to either the i-gel or Portex Soft Seal laryngeal mask group, within a large Australian ambulance group. Primary outcome was successful insertion of the airway. The i-gel had a significantly higher success rate than Portex Soft Seal and significantly lower median ease of insertion scores.

Link to abstract

Insertion of six different supraglottic airway devices whilst wearing chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-personal protective equipment: a manikin study

Castle N, Pillay Y, Spencer N. Anaesthesia 2011; 66(11): 983-8

Six different supraglottic airway devices, including i-gel®, were tested by 58 paramedics for speed and ease of insertion in a manikin, whilst wearing either a standard uniform or chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-person protective equipment (CBRN-PPE). During the latter test, i-gel® was the fastest of the six to insert with a mean insertion time of 19 seconds. Overall, the wearing of CBRN-PPE has a detrimental effect on insertion time of supraglottic airways.

Link to abstract.