i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Failed tracheal intubation in obstetric anaesthesia: 2 yr national case–control study in the UK

Quinn AC, Milne D, Columb M, Gorton H and Knight M. Br J Anaesth. 2013 Jan;110(1):74-80

The purpose of this UK-wide study was to further evaluate the predetermined rate that one in 250 obstetric patients suffer failed intubation whilst undergoing general anaesthesia. Due to the lack of national figures, the study used the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS) of data collection in centres across the UK to record incidence, risk factors and any reports of failed intubations. All contacted centres responded, equalling 57 completed reports, giving a unit-based estimation of one case in every 224 patients. Univariate analyses also recorded in detail in this report.

Link to abstract.

 

 

The i-gel® supraglottic airway- a useful tool in case of difficult fibreoptic intubation

Emmerich M, Tiesmeier J. Minerva Anestesiol 2012; 78(10): 1169-70

A 69-year-old man with a history of difficult intubation could not be intubated via conventional bronchoscopy. Different ETT sizes and airway manoeuvres were tried without success, until the bronchoscope was properly placed through a size 5 i-gel. Operation was completed without complication and the patient reported no neck discomfort or difficulty breathing.

Abstract text

General anesthesia in a case of right-sided aortic arch with Kommerell’s diverticulum diagnosed on preoperative examination

Nakano S, Uda R, Nakajima O, Yamamoto N, Akatsuka M. Masui 2012; 61(7): 765-8

Case of the use of i-gel as preferred airway device and vehicle for tracheal intubation in a 59-year-old male with known Kommerell’s diverticulum, scheduled for repair of a tibial fracture under general anaesthesia. The i-gel® resulted in an uneventful operation with both controlled and spontaneous respiration, and the authors’ conclude that i-gel® is a useful device in such specific cases.

Abstract text

Tracheal intubation through i-gel® conduit in a child with post-burn contracture

Gupta Richa, Gupta Ruchi, Wadhawan S, Bhadoria P. J Anaesth Clin Pharmacol 2012; 28(3): 397–398

Report of i-gel® (size 2.5) used as a conduit for intubation on a nine-year-old girl scheduled for post-burn contracture with limited neck extension. Spontaneous ventilation and depth of anaesthesia were maintained, even after removal of the i-gel®. Authors conclude that fibreoptic ventilation through i-gel® is a ‘highly successful technique’.

Link to abstract.

 

The i-gel™ - A promising airway device for magnetic resonance imaging suite

Taxak S, Bhardwaj M, Gopinath A. J Anaesth Clin Pharmacol 2012; 28(2): 263–264

Two successful cases of paediatric i-gel® used to manage the airway during brain MRI under general anaesthesia. The first, a three-month-old, was maintained using size one; whilst a size two was used on the second case, a boy aged three-and-a-half with a Mallampati score of two. Usual capnography readings taken to ensure secure placement, and in both cases there was no evidence of desaturation. Compared to other laryngeal mask airways, the authors conclude that i-gel® suffers no risk of displacement, meaning intubation does not have to be repeated on known sensitive patients. They also deduce that i-gel® has other advantages, including ease of insertion and minimum adverse effects on removal of the device. Large studies are required, however, to ‘confirm its usefulness’.

Link to abstract.