i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

How do different brands of size 1 laryngeal mask airway compare with face mask ventilation in a dedicated laryngeal mask airway teaching manikin?

Tracy MB, Priyadarshi A, Goel D, Lowe K, Huvanandana J, Hinder M. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2018 May;103(3)

This manikin study assessed and compared the delivered ventilation of seven, size 1 LMA devices with two different face masks using self-inflating bags (SIBs). 40 participants carried out resuscitation on a specialised infant training manikin using the LMAs and the face masks in a random fashion. Findings have shown that the i-gel had the highest peak inspiratory pressure and higher PEEP compared to the other devices. In addition, the i-gel showed no insertion failures and all users described it as easy to use. Thus, these results indicate that the i-gel may become the primary resuscitation device used for newborn resuscitation.

Link to abstract.

Comparison of blind intubation through the I-gel and the Air-Q™ by novice physicians during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A randomized, crossover, manikin trial.

Szarpak Ł. Am J Emerg Med. 2017 Mar;35(3):509-510. Epub 2016 Nov 12.

This study set out to determine the efficacy of blind intubation by novice physicians using the i-gel and the Air-Q devices. Prior the study, a training session focused on anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the airways, as well as methods for airway control was provided to all participants. The novice physicians were randomly assigned to either the i-gel or the Air-Q. Several parameters were assessed including time to intubation (primary outcome), time to secure the airway, efficacy of blind intubation and difficulty of the procedure (measured in visual-analogue scale or VAS). Results showed that the time for airway management was 6.5 seconds for the i-gel and 11 seconds for the Air-Q. Time to intubation was significantly shorter when using the i-gel as compared to the Air-Q. Moreover, the effectiveness of intubation was 90% for the i-gel and 78% for the Air-Q. i-gel also had a lower VAS score, and the majority of the participants preferred it to the Air-Q. Therefore, these results suggest that the i-gel represents a better choice for blind intubation by novice physicians when performing CPR.

Link to abstract.

Effect of Local Anesthesia and General Anesthesia Using I-gel Laryngeal Mask Airway in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgery: Comparative Study

Amer GF, Abdeldayem OT, Lahloub FMF. Anesth Essays Res 2019 Apr-Jun; 13(2): 209-213

This investigation assessed the use of the i-gel as an alternative to local anaesthesia (LA) in insulin dependents diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery. 60 diabetic patients were randomly assigned to receive either LA or general anaesthesia (n = 30) in combination with the i-gel (n = 30). Several parameters were monitored including mean arterial blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), as well as blood glucose levels and plasma cortisol levels. Results have shown no significant difference in either blood glucose or cortisol levels in both groups. However, blood glucose level increased in both groups after induction of anaesthesia. In addition, HR and MBP increased in the LA group but not in the i-gel group. In conclusion, these results show that both LA and general anaesthesia using the i-gel are safe and do not produce a marked impact in hemodynamics, blood glucose, or cortisol levels in diabetic patients.

Link to abstract.

i-gel as an intubation conduit: Comparison of three different types of endotracheal tubes

Choudhary N, Kumar A, Kohli A, Wadhawan S, Bhadoria P. Indian J Anaesth. 2019 Mar;63(3):218-224

This investigation aimed to compare the successful intubation rate of the i-gel using three types of endotracheal tubes (ETTs). 75 ASA I and II patients (age 18-60 years) undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia were randomly assigned into three groups based on the type of endotracheal ETT, which included polyvinyl chloride ETT (Group P), intubating laryngeal mask airway ETT (Group I) and flexometallic ETT (Group F). Recorded parameters included time taken for successful intubation, success rate, number of attemps, manoeuvres, and complications. Results demonstrated that Group P had the lowest time and mean time for intubation, as well as the highest first attempt and overall intubation success rate. Therefore, the combination of polyvinyl chloride ETT with i-gel to intubate patients with difficult airways represents the most successful approach compared to other combinations. However, additional studies are needed to validate these results.

Link to abstract.

Comparison of I-gel for general anesthesia in obese and nonobese patients

Prabha R, Raman R, Parvez Khan M, Kaushal D, Siddiqui A, and
Abbas H. Saudi J Anaesth. 2018 Oct-Dec; 12(4): 535–539

This prospective controlled study aimed to examine the clinical performance of the i-gel in both obese and non-obese patients. 32 patients were divided into two groups, group O (BMI >30 kg/m2) and group C (BMI between 18.5 and 29.9 kg/m2). A range of parameters were evaluated including OLP (primary outcome), leak fraction, time taken to insert the device, ease of insertion, fiberoptic glottis view and adverse events. Results have demonstrated that OLP was marginally higher in Group O in comparison to group C (but not statistically different). In regards to the other parameters and side effects, these were comparable in both groups. Therefore, the i-gel provides an effective tool for the airway management of both obese and non-obese patients.

Link to abstract