i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Randomized crossover comparison of the laryngeal mask airway classic with i-gel® laryngeal mask airway in the management of difficult airway in post burn neck contracture patients

Singh J, Yadav MK, Marahatta SB, Shrestha BL. Indian J Anaesth 2012; 56(4): 348-52

Prospective, crossover, randomised trial of i-gel® against cLMA on 48 post-burn neck contracture patients with reduced neck movement and mouth opening. Primary outcome was overall success rate, with other measurements taken in time to ventilation, leak pressure, fibreoptic view and visualisation of square wave pattern. Success rate for i-gel® was 91.7%, against 79.2% for cLMA. i-gel® outperformed cLMA in all measurements. Authors conclude their study has ‘better clinical performance in the difficult airway management of the airway in the post burn contracture of the neck’.

Link to abstract.

Randomized crossover comparison of the laryngeal

Singh J, Yadav MK, Marahatta SB, Shrestha BL. Indian J Anaesth 2012; 56(4): 348-52

Prospective, crossover, randomised trial of i-gel® against cLMA on 48 post-burn neck contracture patients with reduced neck movement and mouth opening. Primary outcome was overall success rate, with other measurements taken in time to ventilation, leak pressure, fibreoptic view and visualisation of square wave pattern. Success rate for i-gel® was 91.7%, against 79.2% for cLMA. i-gel® outperformed cLMA in all measurements. Authors conclude their study has ‘better clinical performance in the difficult airway management of the airway in the post burn contracture of the neck’.

Abstract text 

 

Tracheal intubation through i-gel® conduit in a child with post-burn contracture

Gupta Richa, Gupta Ruchi, Wadhawan S, Bhadoria P. J Anaesth Clin Pharmacol 2012; 28(3): 397–398

Report of i-gel® (size 2.5) used as a conduit for intubation on a nine-year-old girl scheduled for post-burn contracture with limited neck extension. Spontaneous ventilation and depth of anaesthesia were maintained, even after removal of the i-gel®. Authors conclude that fibreoptic ventilation through i-gel® is a ‘highly successful technique’.

Link to abstract.

 

Insertion of six different supraglottic airway devices whilst wearing chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-personal protective equipment: a manikin study

Castle N, Pillay Y, Spencer N. Anaesthesia 2011; 66(11): 983-8

Six different supraglottic airway devices, including i-gel®, were tested by 58 paramedics for speed and ease of insertion in a manikin, whilst wearing either a standard uniform or chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-person protective equipment (CBRN-PPE). During the latter test, i-gel® was the fastest of the six to insert with a mean insertion time of 19 seconds. Overall, the wearing of CBRN-PPE has a detrimental effect on insertion time of supraglottic airways.

Link to abstract.

 

 

 

The influence of head and neck position on ventilation with the i-gel® airway in paralysed, anaesthetised patients

Sanuki T, Uda R, Sugioka S, Daigo E, Son H, Akatsuka M, Kotani J. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2011 Aug;28(8):597-9

20 adult patients scheduled for oral surgery were ventilated using the i-gel®. Leak pressure, ventilation score and fibreoptic view were measured with the patient’s head and neck in neutral position, extended position, flexion and rotated to the right. Leak pressure was higher during flexion, lower during extension and comparable to neutral position during rotation. Ventilation score was significantly worse during flexion. Fibreoptic view was not affected by head and neck position. The authors recommend that the i-gel® is not used in cases where head and neck flexion is likely, but they state that it is otherwise suitable for surgery where the head is moved.

Link to abstract.