i-gel® from Intersurgical: clinical evidence listing

A comprehensive list of all known published clinical evidence on the device

Influence of airway management strategy on 'no-flow-time' in a standardized single rescuer manikin scenario - a comparison between LTS-D and i-gel®

Wiese CHR, Bahr J, Popov AF, Hinz JM, Graf BM. Resuscitation 2009; 80(1): 100-103

This paper compared i-gel® to another supraglottic airway in a manikin cardiac arrest scenario. The study evaluated the effect use of these devices had on No-Flow Time (NFT). The authors stated that ‘an ideal supraglottic airway should be inserted rapidly with minimal training and it should enable controlled ventilation’. i-gel® met those criteria during resuscitation in a manikin and NFT was kept as low as possible, consistent with ERC guidelines.

Link to abstract.

Comparison of clinical performance of i-gel® with LMA Proseal® in elective surgeries

Singh I, Gupta M, Tandon M. Indian J Anaesth 2009; 53(3): 302-305

This clinical investigation into performance of i-gel® compared to another supraglottic airway with gastric access, concluded that i-gel® was easier to insert, required fewer attempts at insertion, had easier gastric tube placement and was less traumatic than the other device tested. Sixty patients were randomly assigned into two groups: Group 1 (n=30) for i-gel® and Group P (n=30). Assessment was made of sealing pressure, ease of insertion, success rate of insertion, ease of gastric tube placement, airway trauma by post operative blood staining of the device, tongue, lip and dental trauma, hoarseness, regurgitation/aspiration and cost effectiveness.

Link to abstract.

 

Oesophageal seal of the novel supralaryngeal airway device i-gel® in comparison with the laryngeal mask airways Classic and ProSealTM using a cadaver model

Schmidbauer W, Bercker S, Volk T, Bogusch G, Mager G, Kerner T. Br J Anaesth 2009; 102(1): 135-139

The three supraglottic devices were inserted into eight unfixed cadaver models with exposed oesophagi, connected to a water column producing both a slow and fast oesophageal pressure increase. During a fast increase of oesophageal pressure (simulated vomiting procedure) with the oesophageal lumen of the i-gel® and pLMA open, the authors reported that ‘the entire oesophageal liquid was drained to the outside without any tracheal aspiration occurring.’

Link to abstract.

 

 

Airway management in the outpatient setting: new devices and techniques

Jolliffe L, Jackson I. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2008; 21(6): 719- 722

This review highlighted the potential benefits of the current supraglottic airway devices available and their suitability for ambulatory surgery. With regard to i-gel®, it was commented that it was designed to ‘anatomically fit the perilaryngeal and hypolaryngeal structures without the need for an inflatable cuff. This offers the potential for easier insertion, reduced tissue compression and increased stability after insertion.’ They further reported that, ‘Higher mean seal pressures help to facilitate ventilation in laparoscopic work’.

Link to abstract.

 

Phenomenon with i-gel® airway?

Baxter, S. Anaesthesia 2008; 63(11): 1265

This correspondence article reports a problem that occurred in two patients ventilated with an i-gel® during anaesthesia. In the first case, anaesthesia started to lighten and end-tidal sevoflurane fell. The user suspected air entrainment through the suction port. In the second case, anaesthesia remained stable but end-tidal sevoflurane still dropped. The user placed a finger over the suction port and sevoflurane levels returned to normal. In both cases, the i-gel® was replaced with a laryngeal mask airway.

Link to abstract.